In an article on BBC.com, SAP has partnered with the Women’s Tennis Association to create a program that analyzes real-time data during a match that can provide valuable insight for players and coaches. In an article on BBC.com, readers got a sneak-peek into the technological innovations emerging in the world of women's tennis during the WTA Finals in Singapore.

SAP partnered with the Women’s Tennis Association to create a program that analyzes real-time data during a match that can provide valuable insight for players and coaches. The technology was showcased during the WTA Finals in Singapore, but will be utilized for the first time on the court during the Brisbane Invitational Tournament in Australia, in January.

On-court coaching sessions during changeovers and between sets have been allowed since 2008. But with this new program, coaches will have all the statistics from their current match at their fingertips – viewable from a tablet on the court.

"The screen is basically tracking simple kinds of stats around aces, double faults, first-serve percentages,” explains Jenni Lewis, SAP’s technology lead for tennis. “What [coaches] will be able to do is actually look at that and drill down a little deeper to be able to find exactly what's happening out there on the court."

Not only does this completely change how coaching women's tennis as we’ve traditionally known it, but it allows coaches to save time by sharing detailed game analysis with each of their players.

"Players are going to be able to see what their tendencies are, or what their opponent's tendencies are," said Chris Burton, VP of Global Sponsorships at SAP. "And I think that's what you're going to see when this gets to Brisbane in January."

Another main goal of SAP incorporating technology into the world of tennis is to enhance the WTA’s ability to reach their fans. The Coaches wear microphones during televised matches that allow fans at home to hear coaches when they’re speaking to their players during the match.

The WTA hope to soon provide fans with access to the same statistical information available to coaches and players, but the amount of access has yet to be determined.

 

Original article written by Sarah Porter, BBC News Singapore. “Tablet Tennis: How app could transform the women’s game”

http://www.bbc.com/news/technology-29707494